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Preachers and Preaching…

Paul, an apostle (not from men nor through man, but through Jesus Christ and God the Father who raised Him from the dead), and all the brethren who are with me

Galatians 1:1-2

What’s so important about Paul, or the disciples, or preachers who claim that they are “called and ordained servants of the Word?”  Why ought we to hear them and their words as they speak God’s Word to us?  Because they speak their own word?  Are we to listen to them simply because they say that we should, on account of their dynamism, their charisma, their “flare” in the pulpit, because they’re easy to listen to?

In Luke 10, our Lord Jesus says, “He who hears you hears Me, he who rejects you rejects Me, and he who rejects Me rejects Him who sent Me” (Luke 10:16).  Jesus says these words to His disciples.  As they speak His Word, those who hear are hearing God’s Word and not the Word of man.  Not hearing this word, however, is not only rejecting the Word which Christ sent the preachers to preach, but is, in truth, rejecting Christ.

We, however, don’t like to hear these words of our Lord.  If it was the Lord’s Word that the pastor was speaking, and if the Lord had truly sent him, where is the charisma?  Where is the Spirit empowering the preacher to be such a preacher that all eyes are on him, all ears attentive to every word that he speaks, and every word flowing from his mouth seems ‘heaven sent.’

What we often find seems to be just the opposite!  The pastor lacks charisma.  He’s not a Tony Robbins or another motivational speaker.  The sermon might sound unstructured and sometimes seem to have little point.

In essence, the pastor and the words that he preaches appear so ordinary, so ‘ho-hum,’ that for those seeking something else, they become quite dissatisfied, cast stones at the preacher, and question whether God is really and truly present.

The test of a Godly sent preacher, however, is NOT his dynamism, charisma, delivery, or style of sermon.  Those who look for such things will largely not only be disappointed, but are judging things by their own standards and not according to God’s Word.

The test of a Godly preacher is one who preaches the Word—not just one who says that he (not she) does, but one who actually does, distinguishing and preaching Law and Gospel.  Evaluations of performance in the secular world are one thing.  But evaluating a preacher and His words are to be done differently than in the secular world—not according to what or how we want to hear, but according to what God has already revealed in His Word.  And where a preacher preaches faithfully according to the Word, there is where we ought to be when the Word of God (not man) is preached.  Those who keep themselves away are very close to despising “preaching and God’s Word” (Explanation to the Third Commandment, Luther’s Small Catechism).

Luther

In these first two chapters (Paul) does almost nothing else but sent forth his calling, his ministry, and his Gospel.  He affirms that it was not from men; that he had not received it from men but from the revelation of Jesus Christ; and that if he or an angel from heaven were to bring any gospel other than that which he had preached, he should be accursed. (Luther’s Lectures on Galatians, LW 26, p16)

Prayer: Heavenly Father, give us faithful preachers who preach nothing but your Holy Word.  Grant us discernment that we might resist the temptation to despise our pastor and his word because of how he preaches, and rather, that we hear him as he rightly is—your messenger and servant who proclaims salvation through Christ Jesus alone.  Amen.

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One Response

  1. nice 🙂

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