• February 2011
    S M T W T F S
    « Dec   Mar »
     12345
    6789101112
    13141516171819
    20212223242526
    2728  
  • Audio Sermons & Devotions

  • Recent Posts

  • Post Categories

  • Fighting for the Faith

  • Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 561 other followers

  • Blog Stats

    • 39,464 hits
  • Advertisements

Ligonier Ministries–2011 National Conference

2011 National Conference | Ligonier Ministries Events.

The upcoming Ligonier National Conference, entitled, “Light & Heat: A Passion for the Holiness of God,” sounds like it may be a decent conference.  I am not Reformed, but might find such a conference stimulating, especially in light of the “spirit” of today’s Christendom.  It’s encouraging to hear other voices with a concern for what God says.

On that note, just a few comments concerning information about the conference…

The third paragraph of the above site states:

“Several essential doctrines of the Christian faith are under attack in our day, even from within the church, and it is important that we be well grounded in these truths so that we may have a deep affection for our triune God. John Piper will join me and Ligonier teaching fellows Sinclair Ferguson, Robert Godfrey, Steven Lawson, and R.C. Sproul Jr. as we look at several important tenets of the faith, such as divine sovereignty, biblical worship, evangelism and missions, apologetics, and justification.”

While I wholeheartedly agree that the Christian faith is under attack in our day, even from within the church, I question the following, 1) that it is only “important” that we be well grounded in these essential doctrines 2) so that we may have deep affection for our triune God, and 3) that divine sovereignty, biblical worship, evangelism and missions, apologetics, and justification are only “important tenets of the faith.”

St. Paul writes to Timothy these words, “Take heed to yourself and to the doctrine.  Continue in them, for in doing this you will save both yourself and those who hear you” (1 Timothy 4:16).  Certainly, Paul the apostle is not only talking about a few teachings of the Christian faith here.  Notice that he writes, “the doctrine,” singular with the definite article, not doctrines, plural.  “The doctrine” is that which Paul taught to Timothy, that which is of God.  It was not only important to be grounded in this one doctrine (not many), but necessary to be grounded so.  “Take heed” (or “pay close attention to”) and “continuing,” tied with salvation, cannot mean only important, but a necessity—if Timothy was to save himself and those who heard him.

Interestingly, I couldn’t find the phrase “affection for God” anywhere in the New Testament.  I am genuinely ignorant of this phrase with reference to God.  I just don’t know what it means.  I have some guesses, but that’s all they are.  I’m more familiar with God’s compassion towards those in need (i.e. the sick, demon-possessed, etc.) and His people (i.e. those who cry out to Him, God’s love in Christ), as well as how we are to be with one another, than with having “deep affection for the triune God.”  This is a different way of talking.  If faith is meant, fine.  But then just say “faith.”  So what is meant?  I’m cautious about the use of unfamiliar words.  They may indicate a different theology going on.

Important tenets of faith…Absolutely necessary or negotiable?  That’s the way I read such wording (the latter, not the former), though I assume that such is not the intention of the writer.  Or is it?  I don’t know.  One might honestly ask the question if such examples as “divine sovereignty, biblical worship, evangelism and missions, apologetics, and justification” are only “important tenets.”  To claim as such seems to somehow minimize them in some way.  It also implies that only some doctrines are of importance.  But what happens when one is taken away?  Does Christianity still stand?  Is all doctrine equal (on the same level)?  And finally, what is it that makes doctrine Christian doctrine, in contrast to nonChristian doctrine?

These are just a few thoughts on an “advertisement” for an upcoming conference.  Will it be worthwhile?  It may be, but discernment is certainly in order.

Advertisements

“No One Can Serve Two Masters”

In the First Article of the Apostles’ Creed, Christians everywhere confess, “I believe in God the Father Almighty, maker of heaven and earth.” These are not meaningless words. Nor are the words empty of meaning. Christians actually believe them. To say them but not to believe them is be a “play Christian,” one who mouths the words, but does not really mean what he says.

But we are no “play Christians.” We are not playing any games when we confess these words of the First Article of the Creed. We actually believe that according to the Bible, God did make heaven and earth. We believe that God created heaven and earth, just as recorded in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, not in the way that macro Evolutionists or theistic evolutionists believe, but exactly in the way God has revealed it. To say otherwise is, really, to call God a liar, and no child of God can do this and remain a child of God. The child of God takes God at His Word and does not follow his own opinions and determinations with the things of God…

Mt06.24-34, Epiphany 8, 2011A.pdf

“Membership in the Christian Congregation”

St. Paul the apostle writes, “Now I plead with you, brethren, by the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that you all speak the same thing, and that there be no divisions among you, but that you be perfectly joined together in the same mind and in the same judgment. For it has been declared to me concerning you, my brethren, by those of Chloe’s household, that there are contentions among you. Now I say this, that each of you says, “I am of Paul,” or “I am of Apollos,” or ‘I am of Cephas,’ or ‘I am of Christ.’ Is Christ divided? Was Paul crucified for you? Or were you baptized in the name of Paul?” (1 Corinthians 1:10-13).

Times have not changed much.  Divisions abound in what is called Christendom today.  Some of the division does indeed have to do with personalities and individual conflict.  Others have to do with disagreement as to “how” something is to be done.  But the majority of conflict and division within visible Christendom has to do with doctrine, that is, the teaching.  Not all say the same thing.  This is important to note, for “not saying the same thing” indicates, not a joyous diversity, but a lamentable divide, a divide which cannot be reconciled unless doing the hard work of sitting down and hashing out the differences of content and substance.

If all churches within Christendom taught the same thing, all churches would be saying the same thing.  Then, it wouldn’t matter at all which church one attended, for they would be hearing the same Word, the same doctrine, and confessing the same Christ.

Unfortunately, such is not the case.  It seems like churches can’t even agree on what is divisive and what is not.  We don’t agree on what the chief article is, the use of the Sacraments, or the ‘way’ of doing church (Liturgical vs. ‘Contemporary’), just to name a few.  Yet, even with these disagreements, there is the overwhelming one—of Christ and His Word, the distinction between Law and Gospel, and salvation by God’s grace through faith alone (and the meaning of the all of these).

Such disunity demonstrates itself, not only in the doctrine between various congregations and church bodies, but also within the membership of a particular congregation itself.  American Christians generally have forgotten, it seems, the significance of membership in a congregation.  Some join and/or remain members of a congregation merely because of the ‘fellowship’ (not of doctrine, but of friends, family, etc.), on account of the school or programs and activities offered, or simply because that’s the only congregation that they’ve known.

Though these might be attractions and reasons for remaining a member of a certain congregation, clearly omitted from such consideration is that of doctrine.  In other words, what does the congregation believe, teach, and confess?  What does the pastor preach?  Is what the pastor preaches and what the congregation teaches and practices according to God’s Word?  If it is, that is THE reason to become a member and to remain a member of that congregation.  If it isn’t, that is reason to either try to bring about reform or to find a congregation where the preaching and teaching IS according to Holy Scripture and centered on Christ Jesus.

Contrary to what Frank Senn writes,[1] church can be the true Church.  The Lutheran Confessions (as in the Book of Concord, www.bookofconcord.org), and specifically Article VII of the Augsburg Confession, states, “1 It is also taught among us that one holy Christian church will be and remain forever. This is the assembly of all believers among who the Gospel is preached in its purity and the holy sacraments are administered according to the Gospel. 2 For it is sufficient for the true unity of the Christian church that the Gospel be preached in conformity with a pure understanding of it and that the sacraments be administered in accordance with the divine Word. 3 It is not necessary for the true unity of the Christian church that ceremonies, instituted by men, should be observed uniformly in all places. 4 It is as Paul says in Eph. 4:4, 5, “There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called to the one hope that belongs to your call, one Lord, one faith, one baptism.”

The true church consists of all who believe in the Gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ (according to the Bible, not according to the ‘church’ or individual interpretation).  Thus in the Third article of the Apostles’ Creed, Christians everywhere confess, “I believe in…the Holy Christian Church, the Communion of Saints.”

Of course, the reference here is to the unseen, or hidden, church, the body of all believers in Christ, that is, those still living, as well as of those who have already died, having faith in Jesus Christ.  Yet Article VII speaks of the Gospel preached and the holy sacraments (Holy Baptism and Holy Communion) administered.  This means the local congregation, not heaven, where these very things are going on and being given.

Thus, the true church is not only a possibility, but to be sought out.  Such true church preaches the Gospel in its purity and administers the holy sacraments according to the Gospel.  To infer as Senn does that such church is an impossibility is really to forfeit the true doctrine (if he ever claims that such exists), and to decry and denounce “gathering the faithful into a community of ‘pure doctrine’” as “sectarian strategy.”[2]

But what does the Lord say?  “If you abide in My word, you are My disciples indeed.  And you shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free” (John 8:31-32) and, “If anyone loves Me, he will keep My word; and My Father will love him, and We will come to him and make Our home with him.  He who does not love Me does not keep My words; and the word which you hear is not Mine but the Father’s who sent Me” (John 14:22-23).

Seeking to abide/remain/continue in Jesus’ Word and keeping that Word must not be a “sectarian strategy,” as Senn postulates, but must be what the Lord Himself desires of them that He calls His children and people.  To not do so, to seek something other than what the Lord says, is to go against God, and to seek not to be His people—a sure sign that one is in error and truly does not love God.


[1] Frank C. Senn, “Lutheran Identity and Denominational Loyalty,” Lutheran Forum, 44, no. 4  (Winter 2010): 56.  Senn writes, “I am under no illusion that my denomination is the one true holy catholic Church.  Precisely because of the reality of denominationalism no one denomination can make that claim.  Even the Roman Catholic church is but one denomination among others; it is not so ‘Catholic’ as to embrace in one fellowship all Christians and it is too ‘Roman’ for many.  No church can be the true Church, or even ‘a’ true church, because it lacks some quantity or quality of the notes of unity, holiness, catholicity, and apostolicity that we confess in the Nicene Creed.”

[2] Ibid., 54.

“The Ecumenical Movement-A Brief Assessment”

According to William Rusch, a Lutheran pastor serving as Adjunct Professor at Yale Divinity School and New York Theological Seminary, the ecumenical movement has as its goal “the visible unity of divided churches.”[1] This is a laudable goal, to be sure.  However, such a goal is untenable, for the simple reason that we live in a fallen world.

Current ecumenical efforts have shown (i.e. ELCA, Joint Declaration of Justification by Faith[2], etc.) that in order to “show” such a “visible unity,” the method must be one of compromise and the “appearance” of a unity that does not truly exist.  Genuine unity has to do with doctrine.  It is not the work of man.  It is the work of God.  It expresses itself, not in a diverse array of confessions and statements, but in the united confession of Christ according to His Word.  Where such confession remains nonexistent, regardless of “intentions,” true unity does not yet exist and cannot demonstrate itself.

To report that “substantial agreement,” “common understanding,” and “common views” exist between various church bodies[3] that are in dialogue does not yet indicate visible unity.  It shows that much work still needs to be done.

Defining terms, so crucial in the sciences, is also necessary here.  Also necessary is not only the agreement of the definition of a particular word or phrase, but agreement in its particular usage, and also as it relates to the whole.

Take for example the article of justification.  What is it (definition)?[4] Is this the central article of the Christian faith by which the Church stands or falls,[5] or is it just one article among many?  If it is just one article among many, how important is it?  If the article of justification is only “more” important than others, how is it “connected” with the others, if at all?

Such dialogue may indeed take place, but it appears to be of little concern in many current discussions.  What is of greater desire, it seems, is to look like “one big church,” regardless of what is sacrificed for the sake of a “visible unity.”

Does this mean that ecumenical efforts are truly out of place and have no importance for today’s Christendom?  From the above it might appear so.  Yet it would be premature to jump to that conclusion.  True ecumenical endeavor has as its root the desire of Christians to gather together in unity (a God-given desire, by the way!), but in the genuine unity of true doctrine and true communion with one another.  Thus, wherever there is already agreement in the true doctrine, there already is genuine unity.[6]

In a fallen world, can such agreement in the true doctrine really exist?  Only as sinners (and church bodies) turn away from their own thoughts and opinions and believe the Christ of Scripture, even the very words of the Bible.  Until then, current ecumenical efforts are in vain, even should all claim to have reached the goal of “visible unity.”  Should that “goal” be reached, yet not with unity in the one true faith according to Holy Scripture, it is a sham unity, and a kind of unity with which God is not pleased (1 Corinthians 1:10; Romans 16:17-18; Ephesians 4:1-6).


[1] William Rusch, “Harvesting the Fruits of Ecumenical Dialogue,” Lutheran Forum, Vol. 44, No. 4 (Winter 2010): 51-53.

[2] Some would certainly debate that any “agreement” has really been found, except to “agree to disagree.”

[3] Rusch, 52.

[4] Augsburg Confession IV: It is also taught among us that we cannot obtain forgiveness of sin and righteousness before God by our own merits, works, or satisfactions, but that we receive forgiveness of sin and become righteous before God by grace, for Christ’s sake, through faith, 2 when we believe that Christ suffered for us and that for his sake our sin is forgiven and righteousness and eternal life are given to us. 3 For God will regard and reckon this faith as righteousness, as Paul says in Romans 3:21-26 and 4:5 (Tappert ed.).

[5] Augsburg XXVIII: The chief article of the Gospel must be maintained, namely, that we obtain the grace of God through faith in Christ without our merits; we do not merit it by services of God instituted by men (Tappert ed.).

[6] Augsburg Confession VII: It is sufficient for the true unity of the Christian church that the Gospel be preached in conformity with a pure understanding of it and that the sacraments be administered in accordance with the divine Word (Tappert ed.).

“Rainbow Rave” at UWP

Exponent Online » Features Lead Story » Rainbow Rave.

For clarification, the gay Lutheran pastor who spoke at the recent Rainbow Rave conference on Nov 6, Javen Swanson, does not represent all Lutherans, nor the Biblical Christian faith.  The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod (LCMS), the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS), and other smaller Lutheran bodies still believe that the very written words of the Bible still do indeed apply today, for they are God’s Word and remain forever (Matthew 24:35; 1 Peter 1:25), and testify of Christ and his Word and work for our salvation (Luke 24:44, 46-47).

The two parts of Swanson’s session on “Christianity and Homosexuality,” which he called, “deconstructive” and “constructive” work, greatly misrepresent the Biblical text (i.e. Genesis 18:16-19:29).  The account of Sodom and Gomorrah is not about hospitality.  It’s about God’s judgment upon a sinful rebellious people, whom, by the way, God would have spared if even 10 righteous had been found in the city (Genesis 18:32).  Romans 1:26-27 could be used as a “proof text” which speaks of homosexuality as sin, but one should also read the entire chapter, esp. verses 18-32.  It’s not just homosexuality which God condemns, but all and every sin. (See 1 Corinthians 6:9-11).  And yet, only those who are called sinners does God forgive, save, and give eternal life (Luke 15; John 3:16; 6:47; 20:31; 1 Timothy 1:15).

If Swanson were to truly present what the Bible says according to that what is written, he would discover a text which throughout does rightly speak against sin, but a text which also clearly reveals Jesus to be the Savior from sin, by means of his death on the cross (John 6:47; 20:31).

If the Bible doesn’t say what it means and doesn’t mean what it says, then why is Swanson so concerned about making it say what it doesn’t?


“Christian preacher brings confrontational message to Platteville campus”

Exponent Online » News » Christian preacher brings confrontational message to Platteville campus.

Concerning “Bill,” the Christian preacher who was on campus Nov 9, the “confrontational message” he preached was likely a message against all kinds of sin, sin, by the way, which is present everywhere, even in the heart.  His preaching was indeed confrontational.  But so is a picture of a drag queen, the abundant and excessive use of profanity, and a message demanding the acceptance of a particular lifestyle or orientation.  Such messages are also confrontational.

I don’t agree with Bill’s method, nor with the central theme of his preaching, nor with the location of his pulpit (he has no call); but by legal right, he can do it, as can others who are in favor of so many “controversial” ideologies and preferences.

When a Christian speaks against the “sins” of society, it’s called “confrontational,” “narrow-minded,” and “intolerant.”  But when anyone speaks against “traditional values,” “Christian ethics,” or a Judeo-Christian morality,” it’s called tolerance.  How is this not a double standard?

As to Bill’s message, I wasn’t there to hear what he had to say, but from the article, it appears that he omitted the central message of Christianity—the forgiveness of sins in Christ Jesus.  Bill was quoted as saying, “I love the college students enough to tell them the truth about God and what he expects, knowing that, by their own admission, many college students fall short of his standards.”  This is what we call “Law” preaching.  It is confrontational.  But the main message of Christianity is not “Law” preaching.  Changing behavior doesn’t save anyone.  It’s the Good News of peace with God, sins forgiven, on account of Jesus’ shed blood on the cross that does (Romans 5:8).  This is what we call Gospel.  It appears that Bill left out this life-giving and life-saving message.


[1] Original article appeared in the Exponent UW-Platteville student newspaper

Thurs, Nov 11, 2010, p2

“True and False Religion”

I am the Way, and the Truth, and the Life; no one comes to the Father, but by Me.

John 14:6

How many religions exist in the world today?  I guess it depends who you ask.   Should you ask one who holds to the pluralism of the day, the answer would be many.  Should you ask a Christian, he will say that there are really only two religions in the world, the true religion (Christianity) and the false religion (all others, regardless of name).

The true religion, Christianity, teachings salvation by grace through faith in Jesus Christ, God’s only begotten Son.  Christianity teaches that Jesus is the only way to heaven.  There are no other ways (Acts 4:12).

The false religion, that is, all other “religions,” teach salvation by what man does, even if it be so little that man does.  This teaches that man contributes in some way to his salvation.  This is a far cry from what the Bible teaches, that man cannot save Himself, even just a little bit (i.e. Ephesians 2:8-9).

Now ask the question, how many Christian denominations exist in Christendom today?  Again, I guess it depends who you ask.  Even thousands might be the answer according to some.

However, should one define Christendom as the body of Christ, there is only one, for there is only one Lord and one faith (Ephesians 4:4-6).

So why so many denominations?  Simply because not all have the same faith.  Not all hold to the one Lord.  Not all confess the same Christ.  Not all believe the Holy Scriptures.  Not all have the same doctrine.

Yet for us, there is one Christ.  There is one way of salvation.  It is not our way or the way of the world or the way of other so-called religions.  It is the way of Christ.   It is Christ!  Amen.

Luther

“Whenever you consider the doctrine of justification and wonder how or where or in what condition to find a God who justifies or accepts sinners, then you must know that there is no other God than this Man Jesus Christ. Take hold of Him; cling to Him with all your heart, and spurn all speculation about the Divine Majesty; for whoever investigates the majesty of God will be consumed by His glory. I know from experience what I am talking about.  But these fanatics, who deal with God apart from this Man, will not believe me. Christ Himself says: “I am the Way, and the Truth, and the Life; no one comes to the Father, but by Me” (John 14:6). Outside Christ, the Way, therefore, you will find no other way to the Father; you will find only wandering, not truth, but hypocrisy and lies, not life, but eternal death. Take note, therefore, in the doctrine of justification or grace that when we all must struggle with the Law, sin, death, and the devil, we must look at no other God than this incarnate and human God.”  (Luther’s Lectures on Galatians, LW 26, p29).

Prayer: Heavenly Father, look with mercy on us sinners, so prone to seek our own ways and to heed the ways of the world.  Lead us not into temptation that we forsake you.  Deliver us from evil, that we cling only to You, and find in You alone our refuge and help.  Be our God and we Your holy people.  Amen.

%d bloggers like this: