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The Confession at Augsburg

 

Who is he who will harm you if you become followers of what is good? But even if you should suffer for righteousness’ sake, you are blessed. “And do not be afraid of their threats, nor be troubled.” But sanctify the Lord God in your hearts, and always be ready to give a defense to everyone who asks you a reason for the hope that is in you, with meekness and fear; having a good conscience, that when they defame you as evildoers, those who revile your good conduct in Christ may be ashamed. For it is better, if it is the will of God, to suffer for doing good than for doing evil.” (1 Pet. 3:13-17)

 

June 25, 1530. This was the very date that the Lutherans gave a public declaration of faith before Emperor Charles V in Augsburg Germany.

The emperor sought unity against the Muslim threat.

Our Lutheran forebearers sought to clearly present, “the Confession of our preachers and of ourselves, showing what manner of doctrine from the Holy Scriptures and the pure Word of God has been up to this time set forth in our lands, dukedoms, dominions, and cities, and taught in our churches” (Preface to the Augsburg Confession).

The Lutherans did seek unity with Rome, but not at any expense.  They were willing to give up much, but not at all in the realm of doctrine, the truth, the Word of God.

Upon this they stood, standing concretely and without wavering.

In 28 articles, the Confessors state, “The Chief articles of faith” and Roman abuses that had been corrected.  Throughout, Scripture references are plentifully made.

Such demonstrate their faithfulness to the biblical text, in distinguishing themselves from Rome and in distancing themselves from other opponents of Rome.

From such Confession of the Lutherans at Augsburg did not come the unity that all sought.  The truth does divide, for not all are of the truth.

Jesus says, “He who is of God hears God’s words” (Jn. 8:47).

Rome then, as now, as well as other opponents of Rome still to this day with the Lutheran Confession at Augsburg disagree and deny.

We cannot.

Heirs of Christ, sons of the kingdom, do not and cannot deny the truth.

They also do not and cannot avoid confessing the truth.

The truth compels them to sound out.

And if such confession of Christ as revealed in Holy Scripture and testified of at Augsburg not unite in the faith, such is reason not to remain silent, but to continue speaking the truth, as we’ve been given, for there will be those who come to it.

As those before us, so we now have the confidence of God in Christ.

Our Confession is not our own.  The doctrine is God’s.  The testimony of Christ crucified.  The testament of sin’s forgiven.  God’s Word revealing.  The Christian church, living and growing. Amen.

Praying-Hands-Stretched-Canvas Heavenly Father, as you gave our forefathers in the faith boldness to declare the truth at Augsburg, so give us clarity and boldness to declare that same faith before the world, that many more know of Your life-giving Word and believe in Christ as we and so have the certainty of sins forgiven and life eternal, through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

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