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“Jesus, the Lamb of God,” John 1:29-42

 

29The next day [John] saw Jesus coming toward him, and said, “Behold, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world! 30This is he of whom I said, ‘After me comes a man who ranks before me, because he was before me.’ 31I myself did not know him, but for this purpose I came baptizing with water, that he might be revealed to Israel.” 32And John bore witness: “I saw the Spirit descend from heaven like a dove, and it remained on him. 33I myself did not know him, but he who sent me to baptize with water said to me, ‘He on whom you see the Spirit descend and remain, this is he who baptizes with the Holy Spirit.’ 34And I have seen and have borne witness that this is the Son of God.”

      35The next day again John was standing with two of his disciples, 36and he looked at Jesus as he walked by and said, “Behold, the Lamb of God!” 37The two disciples heard him say this, and they followed Jesus. 38Jesus turned and saw them following and said to them, “What are you seeking?” And they said to him, “Rabbi” (which means Teacher), “where are you staying?” 39He said to them, “Come and you will see.” So they came and saw where he was staying, and they stayed with him that day, for it was about the tenth hour. 40One of the two who heard John speak and followed Jesus was Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother. 41He first found his own brother Simon and said to him, “We have found the Messiah” (which means Christ). 42He brought him to Jesus.  

 

In the Name of Jesus. Amen.

Jesus-Abraham1 The first and chief article is this, that Jesus Christ, our God and Lord, “was put to death for our trespasses and raised again for our justification” (Rom. 4:25). 2 He alone is “the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world” (John 1:29). “God has laid upon him the iniquities of us all” (Isa. 53:6). 3 Moreover, “all have sinned,” and “they are justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption which is in Christ Jesus, by his blood” (Rom. 3:23-25).

4 Inasmuch as this must be believed and cannot be obtained or apprehended by any work, law, or merit, it is clear and certain that such faith alone justifies us, as St. Paul says in Romans 3, “For we hold that a man is justified by faith apart from works of law” (Rom. 3:28), and again, “that he [God] himself is righteous and that he justifies him who has faith in Jesus” (Rom. 3:26).

5 Nothing in this article can be given up or compromised,6 even if heaven and earth and things temporal should be destroyed. For as St. Peter says, “There is no (tr-463) other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved” (Acts 4:12). “And with his stripes we are healed” (Isa. 53:5). (Smalcald Articles, Part II,  Article I. Christ and Faith)

About 70 hymns in our hymnal use the word “Lamb” in one or more verses, and more often than not, lamb refers, not to a child of God, but to Jesus.

Take for instance the hymn entitled, “The Lamb,” often sung during the season of Lent (and in the section entitled, “Redeemer,” LSB 547).  The first verse alone is pregnant with meaning, and quite related to today’s Gospel:

            The Lamb, the Lamb, O Father, where’s the sacrifice?

            Faith sees, believes God will provide the Lamb of price!

In the book of Genesis, Moses records the account of Abraham, whom God commanded to sacrifice his son, his only son, Isaac.  Abraham, in obedience to the Lord’s Word, sets out to do just this.  But just as Abraham is about to sacrifice his only son, whom he loves, the Lord stops him, and provides a substitute sacrifice, and Abraham called the name of the place, “The Lord will provide” (Genesis 22).  “God will provide the Lamb of price!”

The hymn, “The Lamb” is just one example of many where the word lamb refers to none other than Jesus, the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world.

Do a search in the hymnal on the phrase, “Lamb of God,” and you find about 25 times that this phrase is used.

Significantly, all of the references to “Lamb of God” in these hymns are of Christ.

The hymn, “When All the World Was Cursed,” an Advent hymn, is such a hymn (LSB 346).  The third verse of this meaningful hymn reads:

            Behold the Lamb of God That bears the world’s transgression,

            Whose sacrifice removes The devil’s dread oppression.

            Behold the Lamb of God, Who takes away our sin,

            Who for our peace and joy Will full atonement win.

In a number of our hymns, we confess Christ as the Lamb of God.  Of this we need not be ashamed or hesitant, for Christ, by means of His death, has indeed done so.

There is another place in the hymnal that we confess and sing praise to the Lamb.  That place is the liturgy, even in today’s, where we sing the “Agnus Dei,” Latin for “Lamb of God.”

Based on John 1:29, St. John’s words about Jesus in today’s text, the Agnus Dei which we sing in our communion liturgies is of Christ, “that takest away the sin of the world—have mercy upon us” (LSB DS III, 198).  Here we also pray for the peace of Christ, that which we are not able to live without.

With this song of praise and acclamation of Christ and what He has truly done, we also note the location of such words in our liturgies.  We do not sing the Agnus Dei when Holy Communion is not offered.  But when it is, we certainly do.  The Agnus Dei is sung just after the Words of Institution and the Pax Domini, the Peace, and before the Distribution of Christ’s very body and blood (i.e. see LSB DS III, 197-199).

This is meant to say something.  By it, like John the Baptist, we declare the truth that Christ is truly and really present among us, and for us, in the Sacrament, according to His Word, according to His promise, “This is My Body…This is My Blood…Given for you for the forgiveness of your sins.”

Christ really and truly is present for you, forgiving you your sins and having mercy on you, even granting you peace.

And how do you know this?  Not at all because you see it, feel it, or sense it—but because of the Word of God which makes it known.

This Word is your certainty, and your reason for believing, for it is not the word of man, but the very Word of God.

Sight fades.  Feelings come and go.  Senses mislead.  But not our Lord!  Not His Word.

The words of our Lord are your confidence and foundation, your stand against all the naysayers and disbelievers.  Here, too, you are to know that not man’s word, but God’s Word, is and remains.

It is the Word of the Lord that John the Baptist proclaimed when he said of Jesus, “Behold, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world!”  God had made it clear to John that this Jesus was the Son of God (John 1:34)—in the flesh—the Messiah to come—the Lamb of God.

Of This Servant of the Lord, Isaiah the prophet writes,

“Surely He has borne our griefs And carried our sorrows; Yet we esteemed Him stricken, Smitten by God, and afflicted.  But He was wounded for our transgressions, He was bruised for our iniquities; The chastisement for our peace was upon Him, And by His stripes we are healed.  All we like sheep have gone astray; We have turned, every one, to his own way; And the LORD has laid on Him the iniquity of us all.  He was oppressed and He was afflicted, Yet He opened not His mouth; He was led as a lamb to the slaughter, And as a sheep before its shearers is silent, So He opened not His mouth.  He was taken from prison and from judgment, And who will declare His generation?  For He was cut off from the land of the living; For the transgressions of My people He was stricken” (Isaiah 53:4-8).

The Lord’s Servant of whom Isaiah speaks is Jesus the Christ, the Messiah, the Lamb of God.  The prophet writes of Him.  John declared Him.  This is He whom we sing and confess to be our Savior and the Savior of the world.

This Jesus, God’s Servant, is the Lamb of God who bears all your guilt, all your sin, and all your iniquity.  This Jesus is your Savior.  He is your Savior because by His sacrifice on the cross, the Lord has provided your peace with God.  In Jesus IS your peace with God.

Being in the world, Christ also died for you, for you are in the world.  None are excluded from His glorious and salvific work.  Your sin is not too great nor your works too evil, for Christ died for all.  Nor are your sins little before the just judge.  They merit your eternal death.  But this is just what makes Jesus’ work so kind and giving.  He dies that you might live.  He becomes the sinner that you might be the saint.  He becomes unclean that you might be nothing but clean and holy.

There is one Savior, and one Savior only.  It is He who redeemed you, not “with corruptible things, like silver or gold…but with His precious blood, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot,” as St. Peter writes, and as we confess in the 2nd Article of the Apostles’ Creed.

This Jesus, the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world, has taken away all your sin.  This means that your sin is no longer yours.  Believe Him to be your Savior and so He is, for so He says.  Look for another to save you and your sin will remain on you.

If you bear your own sin, you will die in it.  But if Christ bears your sin, you will live.

Jesus came in order that you live, therefore, in Him, you do.

Therefore, writes Luther, “May you ever cherish and treasure this thought. Christ is made a servant of sin, yea, a bearer of sin, and the lowliest and most despised person. He destroys all sin by Himself and says: “I came not to be served but to serve” (Matt. 20:28). There is no greater bondage than that of sin; and there is no greater service than that displayed by the Son of God, who becomes the servant of all, no matter how poor, wretched, or despised they may be, and bears their sins.[1]

Thus do we gladly, and joyfully, as John did, look to Christ, and find Jesus alone to be our Lord and Savior, encouraging one another in this truth—in Word, in Hymn, in Liturgy, and in Life. Amen.

 

[1]Martin Luther, vol. 22, Luther’s Works, Vol. 22 : Sermons on the Gospel of St. John: Chapters 1-4, ed. Jaroslav Jan Pelikan, Hilton C. Oswald and Helmut T. Lehmann, Luther’s Works (Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1999, c1957), 22:166.

 

Prayer: Dear Jesus, give me faith to believe that you take away all my sins, according to Your Holy Word. Amen.

 

 

 

 

Godly Worship

Biblical and godly worship is not merely that worship of the mouth or of the body, that which a person says or does, though it does include these.  The worship of the Christian is not merely external by nature, though it does reveal itself for others to see.

First and foremost, true, godly worship is that which originates in the heart, the very thing that Jesus addresses when He speaks of those worshiping God in spirit and truth (John 4:23-24).

Such worship in spirit and truth is not self-derived or self-originating, as such worship does not begin, continue, or end with men.  Rather, such worship, acceptable before God and pleasing to the Father, is that worship according to the Lord’s Word which has Jesus Christ as center.

As God’s people, we do not offer any worthiness of our own before God’s altar, but humbly seek from Him His mercy and favor.  We do not dictate to God how He is to be with us.  He reveals how we are to be with Him.

Just here is where the Law convicts.  Yet, just here is also where God’s just judgment, not upon us but upon His Son, so clearly reveals itself.

Our hearts are self-serving and self-seeking.  Apart from God’s grace and mercy in Christ, we do what we do, as pious as it may be, for ourselves.

Yet Jesus came, not to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many (Mark 10:45).

He did nothing for Himself.  In His godly worship to the Father, He has both fulfilled and satisfied all that is absent in our worship before He Who alone deserves all of it.

Through faith in God’s Son, worship in spirit and truth is the kind of worship of God’s people, God’s people who confess their sinfulness and God’s people who have no ounce of confidence of their own, but cling to Christ alone for forgiveness, life, and salvation.  Amen.

 

Prayer: Heavenly Father, look with favor upon us for neglecting He who alone pleases You and through Whom we have Your abiding favor. Grant to us, Your holy people, baptized into your precious Name, true worship of Jesus in spirit and truth in all that we say and do.  Bless us with lively faith, that we boldly confess Your name in the midst of these trying days, and grant us genuine love for one another, that none place himself above of another, but look out for each other’s interests (Philippians 2). Accomplish Your will in and among us, that Your Name be praised and that all glory be Yours, in the Name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Amen.

 

 

The Greatest

 

30[The disciples] went on from there and passed through Galilee. And [Jesus] did not want anyone to know, 31for he was teaching his disciples, saying to them, “The Son of Man is going to be delivered into the hands of men, and they will kill him. And when he is killed, after three days he will rise.” 32But they did not understand the saying, and were afraid to ask him.

      33And they came to Capernaum. And when he was in the house he asked them, “What were you discussing on the way?” 34But they kept silent, for on the way they had argued with one another about who was the greatest. 35And he sat down and called the twelve. And he said to them, “If anyone would be first, he must be last of all and servant of all.” 36And he took a child and put him in the midst of them, and taking him in his arms, he said to them, 37 “Whoever receives one such child in my name receives me, and whoever receives me, receives not me but him who sent me.” (Mark 9:30-37)

 

Because what Jesus says is important, for Jesus is God, His Word is necessary to hear and to believe.  To not do these things is to indicate that God’s Word is not necessary to hear or to believe, even though God says it is.

“We should fear and love God so that we do not despise preaching and His Word, but hold it sacred and gladly hear and learn it.” (Third Commandment)

God’s name is kept holy when the Word of God is taught in its truth and purity, and we, as the children of God, also lead holy lives according to it. Help us to do this, dear Father in heaven! But anyone who teaches or lives contrary to God’s Word profanes the name of God among us. Protect us from this, heavenly Father! (First Petition, How is God’s Name kept holy?)

Inattentive and thoughtless ears and thoughts to God and His Word indicate a cold heart and rejection of the very means by which God gives salvation.

Thank God that the Lord is merciful and kind, and not like us!

The disciples in the text were thinking and talking about matters of a selfish-nature, even after Jesus revealed the sacred truth of what would win their redemption.

Jesus used the content of their discussion to draw their attention to the truth of their condition, that they turn away from selfish ambition and self-centeredness and instead, turn to Him Who is the Greatest and Servant of all.

The disciples’ understanding of greatness reflected their own perception and judgment, that which is common to the sinner, and contrary to God’s will and Word.

The disciples’ understanding of greatness, contrary to greatness in God’s kingdom, is also our own by nature.

What is great among us is that of being first, not last; being held in esteem, having the place of honor, being recognized for accomplishments and activities, having the last word, praise by men.

These ideas concerning the greatest all have at least one thing in common—a comparison to another, and the advancement of self above our neighbor.

About comparing ourselves to others, our Lord speaks clearly.

St. Paul the Apostle writes this to the Christians in Galatia, “Let each one examine his own work, and then he will have rejoicing in himself alone, and not in another.  For each one shall bear his own load” (Galatians 6:4-5).

In other words, be concerned about what you yourself are doing as God’s child within the calling that God has called you.  Judge your work according to what God says, not in how you compare with others.

In another place St. Paul writes, “Not he who commends himself is approved, but whom the Lord commends” (2 Corinthians 10:18).

Praise, honor, and recognition from others is there one moment and gone the next.

It is fleeting and is not the kind of recognition that really matters.

The kind of recognition that really matters is God’s.

What matters is what God says about you, not what others say.

Acceptance by God far outweighs the acceptance that we might desire from others.  The acceptance of the latter, though appreciated, won’t last and does not give eternal life.

The acceptance of the former, the approval of God, is that which is everlasting.

This kind of acceptance – the mercy of God – demonstrates the greatness of God, the greatness of God in loving the sinner, even the sinner like you and like me, who don’t deserve God’s love, kindness, or acceptance.

The way of the world is to merit approval, to earn recognition, to do for greatness.

This is not the way of God.

The way of God is to exalt the humbled, to recognize those who don’t deserve recognition, to approve of those who believe in the merit and work of Another, of His Son, through whom they have forgiveness, peace, and God’s full favor.

Our Lord Jesus, in saying to His disciples, “If anyone would be first, he must be last of all and servant of all,” is speaking of a different kind of greatness than we and the world speak of.  Our Lord is speaking of a different kind of kingdom than the one we are accustomed to desire and live in, where the greatest is the master and the least is the slave.

Jesus here turns all of what we consider greatness upside down.  Instead of being served and seeking to be served and waited on, He speaks of serving.  Instead of the greater being the first, He speaks of the greater being “Last of all and servant of all.”

Jesus Himself is First and Last, the Alpha and the Omega.  Jesus, though He was truly first over all things, one with the Father and the Spirit and Second Person of the Holy Trinity, became last of all and servant of all.

“The Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many” (Mark 10:45).

Jesus made “Himself of no reputation, taking the form of a bondservant, and coming in the likeness of men.  And being found in appearance as a man, He humbled Himself and became obedient to the point of death, even the death of the cross” (Philippians 2:7-8).

Our Lord God descended to us, coming “In the likeness of sinful flesh,” yet “without” the “sin” (Romans 8:3; Hebrews 4:15).  In doing so, He saves – through His death on the cross.

In doing so, God demonstrated His love for you (Romans 5:8).

“God did not send His Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world through Him might be saved” (John 3:17).

Jesus Christ is the servant of all.

He served you in His life and in His death, and in His resurrection and in His ascension, that you have everlasting life.

Greatness in His Kingdom is not about being served by others (except by Him), but of serving others.  It is the serving of even the lowly and the humble in the eyes of the world.

“Whoever receives one such child in my name receives me, and whoever receives me, receives not me but him who sent me.”

This kind of service, the kind of service that God reveals to be great in His Holy Word, is revealed in Jesus Christ.

Jesus, as Lord of lords and King of kings, is the servant of all, who sacrificed Himself in death and rose again the third day.

Through His service to you is life, new life, abundant life, eternal life, yours today.

Ponder His service anew.  In doing so, so you will also begin and continue to serve others, even as our Lord continues to serve you. Amen.

Acceptable Offerings

 

Cain brought an offering of the fruit of the ground to the LORD. Abel also brought of the firstborn of his flock and of their fat. And the LORD respected Abel and his offering, but He did not respect Cain and his offering. And Cain was very angry, and his countenance fell.(Genesis 4:3-5)

 

In the Name of Jesus. Amen.

It wasn’t because of the offering itself that God accepted Abel’s offering and rejected Cain’s.  Both gave offering to the Lord.  But such offering given revealed the kind of man who had given it.

As a farmer, Cain gave what he did, “an offering.”  Abel, as a shepherd of sheep, “brought of the firstborn.”

Lest we think that an animal offering is greater than that of the harvest, consider that the offering of grains and produce were commended and acceptable to God, as revealed in Exodus (i.e. Exodus 29:41).

The distinction between the offerings were not the issue, though the offerings did differ.

The difference between the offering of Abel and that of Cain was that of the heart.  Had Cain believed, at the Lord’s Word, he would have repented and not later murdered his brother (Genesis 4:8).

Cain demonstrated his unrepentance by murdering Abel.

He demonstrated his disbelief with the offering that he had given, not the first of the crop, but simply “of the ground.”

On the other hand, Abel, having offered “of the firstborn and of their fat,” demonstrated faith.  We know this because God accepted the offering of Abel, but not that of Cain.

Had Abel not had faith, his offering would not have been acknowledged by God.

Though we readily look at what is given by mere appearance (and the amount), God looks at the heart from which such gift is given.

We can’t see the heart and its disposition to God.  God can, and God does.

It’s not by the offering and what we do (or don’t do) by which we become (or are) acceptable to God.  Rather, first, we are acceptable to God, and then the offering (and works) are.

Thanks be to God that this is so!

Acceptance by God is not dependent on you.  It’s founded on Jesus Christ.

“By the deeds of the law no flesh will be justified in His sight, for by the law is the knowledge of sin.  But now the righteousness of God apart from the law is revealed, being witnessed by the Law and the Prophets, even the righteousness of God, through faith in Jesus Christ, to all and on all who believe. For there is no difference; for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, being justified freely by His grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus(Rom. 3:20-24).

“Having been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ,(Rom. 5:1).

 

“Faith clings to Jesus’ cross alone

And rests in Him unceasing;

And by its fruits true faith in known,

With love and hope increasing.

Yet faith alone doth justify,

Works serve they neighbor and supply

The proof that faith is living.”

(The Lutheran Hymnal 377 “Salvation unto us has Come,” verse 9)

 

Luther

“First he regarded Abel, the person, and thereafter the offering.  His person was previously good, and right and acceptable.  Thereafter, for the sake of the person, the offering was also.  The person was not acceptable for the sake of the offering.  Then again, he did not regard Cain and his offering.  So also, first he did not regard Cain, the person, and thereafter he also did not regard his offering.  From this text it is certain that it is not possible for a work to be good before God if the person is not previously good and acceptable.  Then again, it is not possible that a work is evil before3 God unless the person is previously evil and unacceptable…God in the Scriptures concludes that all works before justification are evil and of no use and he desires them to be justified and made good first.  Again, he concludes that every person, if they are still by nature in the first birth, are unjust and evil, as Psalm 116:11 says, ‘All men are liars.’ Genesis 6:5, ‘Every thought and desire of the human heart is always evil.’” (Luther’s Family Devotions, p211-212)

 

Prayer: God, forgive me for thinking that You accept me on account of my works and not on account of Your Son who died for me and gave Himself for me that I be acceptable in Your sight.  Help me to believe that, not by my works, but through faith in Jesus alone, I am justified before You. Amen.

 

 

“Worship and God”

 

“You shall not make for yourself a carved image, or any likeness of anything that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth; you shall not bow down to them nor serve them.”  

Exodus 20:4-5, NKJ

 

In the name of Jesus.  Amen.

Church bodies number the commandments differently.  Though they still number them as ten, they do so in a different manner.

The passage above, from Exodus 20:4-5, Lutherans and Roman Catholics include as part of the First Commandment. Others number it as part of the Second Commandment, that of forbidding the making of idols.

The Israelites made an idol of a golden calf while Moses was on Mt. Sinai, even as God was giving the Ten Commandments (Exodus 32:1-6).  The Israelites were certainly worshiping an idol, that which was not God.

Instructive are the words of Luther from his Large Catechism.

“A god is that to which we look for all good and in which find refuge in every time of need. To have a god is nothing else than to trust and believe him with our whole heart. As I have often said, the trust and faith of the heart alone make both God and an idol.  If your faith and trust are right, then your God is the true God. On the other hand, if your trust is false and wrong, then you have not the true God.” (Luther’s Large Catechism, 1st Commandment)

The people of Israel placed their confidence and trust in something which was not God.  That something which was not God, or a false god, was nothing other than an idol.  Things become idols (money, power, people, etc.) when confidence and trust is placed in them rather than the Creator.  But where confidence and trust is placed in the true God, those same things are not idols.

To worship anyone or anything instead of or in place of the true God, the God who reveals Himself in the Bible in the person of Jesus Christ, worships a false God, and therefore, worships an idol, whether that false god be a carved image or not.

Only in the God who makes Himself known through Christ, who was “born of a virgin, suffered, was crucified, died, and was buried” and who rose on the third day do you worship the true God.  Only through Him do you have sins forgiven and true and everlasting peace.

All other so-called “gods” are not gods, and do not give that peace which the Lord Jesus alone gives. Worship that is substantive is not worship invented by man, nor worship in what is invented by man, but that which is given and revealed by God—through His Son, Jesus the Savior.  Amen.

 

Luther

“There would be no harm in carving a statue of wood or stone; but to set it up for worship and to attribute divinity to the wood, stone, or statue is to worship and idol instead of God.” (Luther’s Lectures on Galatians, LW 26, p92)

 

Prayer: Father, keep me from fearing, loving, and trusting in anyone or anything above you.  Amen.

 

 

 

Brief Response to “5 types of People Attending Your Church Less Frequently”

 

https://factsandtrends.net/2018/10/09/5-types-of-people-who-are-attending-your-church-less-frequently/

 

Sanctuary.jpg

In response to the decreasing attendance, Rainer suggests, “…mention the importance of the local church.”  Yes, but also call the sinner to repentance.

 

 

“If anyone serves Me, let him follow Me; and where I am, there My servant will be also.” (Jn. 12:26 NKJ)

“Therefore, brethren, having boldness to enter the Holiest by the blood of Jesus, by a new and living way which He consecrated for us, through the veil, that is, His flesh, and having a High Priest over the house of God, let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with pure water. Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for He who promised is faithful. And let us consider one another in order to stir up love and good works, not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, as is the manner of some, but exhorting one another, and so much the more as you see the Day approaching.” (Heb. 10:19-25 NKJ)

Christians want to gather with other Christians, to hear the Word of God, and to receive Christ’s body and blood for the forgiveness of sins.

Christianity, the Christian faith, is not a “do-it-yourself” religion, but a God-given faith (Romans 10:17).  Those who don’t want to hear Christ also don’t want Christ, his forgiveness, His peace.

 

 

What is Lent?

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