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Waiting on the Lord and the Lord’s Timing

The LORD is good to those who wait for Him, To the soul who seeks Him.

It is good that one should hope and wait quietly For the salvation of the LORD.

Lamentations 3:25-26

 

In the Name of Jesus! Amen.

HoWaiting1w difficult it is to wait! Our society and culture is partly, but not fully, to blame for this. We’ve been taught and trained to expect everything right away, and when we don’t get service immediately, or if we have to wait a little bit, we become impatient. Even as our computer connection slows down, we might become agitated.

But as much as society and culture contribute to the desire for speediness, we, too, are to blame for not waiting as we ought. We easily become frustrated, and even down right angry, if the Lord doesn’t answer us right away, let alone, our own way. We readily forget that the Lord’s timing is not according to our schedule, that He is God and that we are most certainly not.

The Psalmist says of the Lord that, “A thousand years in Your sight Are like yesterday when it is past, And like a watch in the night” (Psalm 90:4). And St. Peter writes similarly, “Beloved, do not forget this one thing, that with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day” (2 Peter 3:8).

Here, of course, both the Psalmist and Peter are not talking about how one day is a thousand years, or that we ought to define a day differently than a 24-hour period of time, unless context reveals otherwise (i.e. Genesis 1-2, Creation). Rather, the Psalmist and Peter are talking about the Lord’s time, and how different God views time than us. We are finite beings. We have a beginning (i.e. conception) and end (physical death). God does not. He always was and always will be (Exodus 3:14).

Time, from God’s perspective, is viewed differently than our own view of time. One day is “nothing” compared to eternity. God is eternal. Therefore, our concept of time is different for us than our Lord. Yet, by His Word He reveals what He does for our benefit and use.

What seems like “forever” for us is only a “moment” in the grand scheme of things. Rather than considering the duration according to our time frame, the Lord calls us to believe 2Cor05.07-4and trust in Him, all the while as we wait on Him

“If then you were raised with Christ, seek those things which are above, where Christ is, sitting at the right hand of God. Set your mind on things above, not on things on the earth. For you died, and your life is hidden with Christ in God. When Christ who is our life appears, then you also will appear with Him in glory” (Colossians 3:1-4).

The Lord’s will be done. This we pray in the “Our Father.” His will is done according to His will, not our own. As we don’t wait, so we also act contrary to the Lord’s will, not believing in Him as the giver of all things. However, as we do wait on Him according to His Word, we will receive the blessing of God’s goodness. This may not be as we expect. Yet, the Lord blesses far more abundantly than we can ever imagine.

Having Jesus as Savior from sin and death means that we now have peace with God. In His favor, we also believe that God’s will is nothing but good toward us. If that means waiting on Him, so we will do gladly, acknowledging that we are in His gracious hands, and to Him we commend our spirit (Psalm 32:1). Since we belong to the Lord, we also know that our God is nothing but good (Psalm 77:1; Lamentations 3:22-24). Amen.

Prayer: Forgive us, Lord, for our impatience, especially our impatience of waiting on you. Help us to endure and persevere, trusting Your blessed promises alone, confident of your abundant goodness, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

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Who is this, that even the wind and the sea obey Him?

On the same day, when evening had come, He said to them, “Let us cross over to the other side.” 36 Now when they had left the multitude, they took Him along in the boat as He was. And other little boats were also with Him. 37 And a great windstorm arose, and the waves beat into the boat, so that it was already filling. 38 But He was in the stern, asleep on a pillow. And they awoke Him and said to Him, “Teacher, do You not care that we are perishing?” 39 Then He arose and rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, “Peace, be still!” And the wind ceased and there was a great calm. 40 But He said to them, “Why are you so fearful? How is it that you have no faith?” 41 And they feared exceedingly, and said to one another, “Who can this be, that even the wind and the sea obey Him!” (Mark 4:35-41, NKJ)

 

In the Name of Jesus. Amen.

Who is this Jesus? The disciples did not yet fully believe who this Jesus was, He who was able to calm wind and sea. Yet, they had seen Him exorcise demons, heal the sick, and forgive sinners. They knew Him personally, as they were with Him, but they did not fully know Him. Though He had already done before their eyes the works of His heavenly Father, they had not grasped, according to His Word, who He was, who Jesus is.

Apart from Jesus’ Word, Jesus cannot be fully known. Appearances deceive. God’s Word does not. Consider that before the disciples was a flesh and blood man, even One who slept on a boat during the storm. Yet, this Man also commanded wind and sea, and they obeyed.

This Jesus is none other than God in the flesh. Consider the Psalmist, who writes,

Those who go down to the sea in ships, Who do business on great waters, They see the works of the LORD, And His wonders in the deep. For He commands and raises the stormy wind, Which lifts up the waves of the sea. They mount up to the heavens, They go down again to the depths; Their soul melts because of trouble. They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man, And are at their wits’ end. Then they cry out to the LORD in their trouble, And He brings them out of their distresses. He calms the storm, So that its waves are still. Then they are glad because they are quiet; So He guides them to their desired haven. Oh, that men would give thanks to the LORD for His goodness, And for His wonderful works to the children of men! Let them exalt Him also in the assembly of the people, And praise Him in the company of the elders. (Psalm 107:23-32)

As much as the Psalmist is writing here about the Lord God, so is He writing about the Lord Jesus. Jesus is the One who brings out of distresses. Jesus is the One who calms the storm and stills the waves. He is the One who guides.

With a Word, Jesus does these things. However, Jesus doesn’t promise that we will not have distress and trouble in this life (John 16:33). Storms will certainly come. Nevertheless, as St. Mark reveals, this Jesus is He who delivers, when and where He wills, for not even wind or sea resist His authority. They cannot, because Jesus created them (John 1:1; Genesis 1:1ff).

More than delivering you from earthly troubles, according to His good and gracious will, Jesus delivers you from eternal troubles. The kingdom of God is near in Jesus (Mark 1:15), then, and now. His healing of the sick, exorcising demons, and calming the storms all demonstrate this. These works of God also reveal who Jesus is, in the flesh, for you and me.

The kingdom of God, Paul tells us, is not “eating and drinking” (Romans 14:17), nor is it “of this world,” as Jesus Himself says (John 18:36). Distresses, trouble, and tribulation will come, as will the storms and wind and water, yet He who has authority over these is also He who has authority over death itself, and who alone gives life, abundant life, eternal life.

“Truly, truly I say to you, he who hears My word and believes in Him who sent Me has everlasting life, and shall not come into judgment, but has passed from death into life. (John 5:24)

Prayer: Dearest Jesus, do not forsake us in our troubles, but deliver us from the evil one, that we remain steadfast in the true faith and not despair of our peace with You, who lived, died, and rose again for our salvation. Amen.

“No One Can Serve Two Masters”

In the First Article of the Apostles’ Creed, Christians everywhere confess, “I believe in God the Father Almighty, maker of heaven and earth.” These are not meaningless words. Nor are the words empty of meaning. Christians actually believe them. To say them but not to believe them is be a “play Christian,” one who mouths the words, but does not really mean what he says.

But we are no “play Christians.” We are not playing any games when we confess these words of the First Article of the Creed. We actually believe that according to the Bible, God did make heaven and earth. We believe that God created heaven and earth, just as recorded in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, not in the way that macro Evolutionists or theistic evolutionists believe, but exactly in the way God has revealed it. To say otherwise is, really, to call God a liar, and no child of God can do this and remain a child of God. The child of God takes God at His Word and does not follow his own opinions and determinations with the things of God…

Mt06.24-34, Epiphany 8, 2011A.pdf

Evolution and the Christian Faith

Believing the theory of evolution, as taught by most science books, really, is the denial of God’s inspired Word. Believing evolution is to say that God’s Word, the Bible, is not God’s Word, nor is it true.

ATP.AboutEvolution.pdf

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