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Hold Fast…

 

“Hold fast the pattern of sound words which you have heard from me, in faith and love which are in Christ Jesus.” (2 Timothy 1:13, NKJ)

 

In the Name of Jesus.  Amen.

How easy it is to be distracted from the things of God to the things of men, to neglect the One thing needful, and to take for granted God’s grace and favor!

St. Paul, writing to Timothy, writes the words above (2 Timothy 1:13), because, as he indicates in v15, “all those in Asia have turned away from me.”  In other words, “those in Asia” ceased listening to Paul and stopped following the words that Paul preached.

Though many do the same thing concerning the very Word of our Lord, and though many view such diversion from the truth as of little significance, for the Christian, the Word of God has more than importance.  The Word of God is life (John 6:63, 68; 2 Timothy 3:15-17), and directs towards Christ Jesus.  The Law shows us our sin.  The Gospel shows us our Savior, Jesus Christ.   Only Christ saves from sin and hell.  The believer believes this, and desires, seeks, and strives to remain in this faith.

The text from this past Sunday speaks about the challenges of being a disciple of Jesus (Luke 14:25-35).  “Holding fast” is such a challenge, for we, of ourselves, are not strong enough to do so.  We are sinners.  But “holding fast the pattern of sound words” is continuing to believe in the Jesus who saves and not in our strength that falters.

God gives strength to remain “in faith and love which are in Christ Jesus” by means of His Word and Sacraments.  God has not forsaken you.  Rather, He continues to call you, preaching His Word of forgiveness and salvation through the death of His Son.  So hear, and hold fast to, Christ, who holds you even more strongly (Philippians 3:12).

Prayer:  Lord Jesus, direct us ever to Your Holy Word which gives life, that we live and not doubt, nor reject Your forgiveness and mercy won for us on the cross.  Keep us fast to you, that we live confidently in and by Your grace alone.  Amen.

“I have my faith”?

Therefore, having been justified by faith,

we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.”

Romans 5:1

In the Name of Jesus. Amen.

There is much talk about faith these days. Recently, I heard one numerous times in discussion say, “I have my faith.” Yet, such talk about faith is quite vague. It seems to emphasize the “me,” of faith, and doesn’t really get to the object of the Christian faith, which is Christ.

MyFaithChristian faith doesn’t exclusively speak in the way of “me” or “my” kind of faith. Rather, Christian faith confesses Christ, front and center.

Remember the words of Jesus. “If anyone desires to come after Me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow Me” (Matthew 16:24).

Remember the words of St. Paul, too. “He who glories, let him glory in the LORD” (1 Corinthians 1:31).

These words also apply to Christian faith, even our own faith, which is neither self-derived or self-chosen, a personal decision or a choice. Rather, the Christian faith is the God-given faith.

The Bible teaches such truth, for as Jesus says, “That which is born of the flesh is flesh. That which is born of the spirit is spirit” (John 3:6). Speaking of the flesh, St. Paul writes, “Those who are in the flesh cannot please God” (Romans 8:8).

According to God’s Holy Word, which is what the Bible is, “those who are in the flesh” are not of faith. This applies to all people, as all people are born through the womb. Naturally, such people are in need of a Savior since the Fall of AdaBorn-of-God1m and Eve (Romans 5:12). Dead in sin, from conception to physical death, a spiritual birth is needed. One must be reborn.

Such rebirth cannot and does not happen by choice or personal decision. That which is dead cannot do anything of itself. It is God, through His Holy Word, which gives life, new life, abundant life (John 6:63, 10:10). Thus do we have Christ, who speaks life, that we be born anew, even through water and word (John 3:5; Titus 3:5; 1 Peter 3:21).

Similar to the account of Jesus calling dead Lazarus from the tomb (John 11:38-44), so Jesus calls us from death to life by means of His Word, even His Word preached today (John 6:63). Where His Holy Word continues to be preached today, He continues to bring forth the hearers from death to life.

The preaching of Christ’s cross does not make Christians either lazy or unproductive (Ephesians 2:10, Galatians 5:6). Instead, the preaching of Christ’s cross, of His death and resurrection, enlivens true faith. Evangelicalism here gets it wrong where they empty their preaching of the Gospel and instead preach only what you must do of yourself and how to live, yet apart from faith in Christ. They also get it wrong where they emphasis personal faith over and against objective faith, which is the faith given by God through the hearing of Christ and His holy Word (Romans 10:17).

This faith, and this faith alone, that which is of God and His Son Jesus Christ, wrought by the Holy Spirit, is that faith which does not seek its own, but glories in Christ, clearly confessing Him to be Savior.

Rom01.16,4The Christian faith does just this, and unashamedly (Romans 1:16). This faith confesses Christ, giving Him and Him alone all the glory. So, more than speaking of “my faith” and taking comfort in what “I personally believe” (subjectively, as in “I have my faith”), the Christian faith speaks of Christ and what He has done for me, according to Holy Scripture. Instead of confessing, “I have my faith,” the Christian boastfully confesses in who that faith is—Christ.

My faith” does not save me. Christ does! Thanks be to God! Amen.

“For the faith that takes hold of Christ, the Son of God, and is adorned by Him is the faith that justifies, not a faith that includes love. For if faith is to be sure and firm, it must take hold of nothing but Christ alone; and in the agony and terror of conscience it has nothing else to lean on than this pearl of great value (Matt. 13:45–46). Therefore whoever takes hold of Christ by faith, no matter how terrified by the Law and oppressed by the burden of his sins he may be, has the right to boast that he is righteous. How has he this right? By that jewel, Christ, whom he possesses by faith. Our opponents fail to understand this. Therefore they reject Christ, this jewel; and in His place they put their love, which they say is a jewel. But if they do not know what faith is, it is impossible for them to have faith, much less to teach it to others. And as for what they claim to have, this is nothing but a dream, an opinion, and natural reason, but not faith.” (Luther’s Lectures on Galatians, LW 26, p88-89)

Prayer: Father in heaven, give us faith which takes hold of Christ and no other. Preserve us in this faith by the means which You freely give and deliver, and keep us from despising Your free gifts of Baptism, Word, and Supper, that we remain yours, and, denying ourselves, follow you. Amen.

Who is this, that even the wind and the sea obey Him?

On the same day, when evening had come, He said to them, “Let us cross over to the other side.” 36 Now when they had left the multitude, they took Him along in the boat as He was. And other little boats were also with Him. 37 And a great windstorm arose, and the waves beat into the boat, so that it was already filling. 38 But He was in the stern, asleep on a pillow. And they awoke Him and said to Him, “Teacher, do You not care that we are perishing?” 39 Then He arose and rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, “Peace, be still!” And the wind ceased and there was a great calm. 40 But He said to them, “Why are you so fearful? How is it that you have no faith?” 41 And they feared exceedingly, and said to one another, “Who can this be, that even the wind and the sea obey Him!” (Mark 4:35-41, NKJ)

 

In the Name of Jesus. Amen.

Who is this Jesus? The disciples did not yet fully believe who this Jesus was, He who was able to calm wind and sea. Yet, they had seen Him exorcise demons, heal the sick, and forgive sinners. They knew Him personally, as they were with Him, but they did not fully know Him. Though He had already done before their eyes the works of His heavenly Father, they had not grasped, according to His Word, who He was, who Jesus is.

Apart from Jesus’ Word, Jesus cannot be fully known. Appearances deceive. God’s Word does not. Consider that before the disciples was a flesh and blood man, even One who slept on a boat during the storm. Yet, this Man also commanded wind and sea, and they obeyed.

This Jesus is none other than God in the flesh. Consider the Psalmist, who writes,

Those who go down to the sea in ships, Who do business on great waters, They see the works of the LORD, And His wonders in the deep. For He commands and raises the stormy wind, Which lifts up the waves of the sea. They mount up to the heavens, They go down again to the depths; Their soul melts because of trouble. They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man, And are at their wits’ end. Then they cry out to the LORD in their trouble, And He brings them out of their distresses. He calms the storm, So that its waves are still. Then they are glad because they are quiet; So He guides them to their desired haven. Oh, that men would give thanks to the LORD for His goodness, And for His wonderful works to the children of men! Let them exalt Him also in the assembly of the people, And praise Him in the company of the elders. (Psalm 107:23-32)

As much as the Psalmist is writing here about the Lord God, so is He writing about the Lord Jesus. Jesus is the One who brings out of distresses. Jesus is the One who calms the storm and stills the waves. He is the One who guides.

With a Word, Jesus does these things. However, Jesus doesn’t promise that we will not have distress and trouble in this life (John 16:33). Storms will certainly come. Nevertheless, as St. Mark reveals, this Jesus is He who delivers, when and where He wills, for not even wind or sea resist His authority. They cannot, because Jesus created them (John 1:1; Genesis 1:1ff).

More than delivering you from earthly troubles, according to His good and gracious will, Jesus delivers you from eternal troubles. The kingdom of God is near in Jesus (Mark 1:15), then, and now. His healing of the sick, exorcising demons, and calming the storms all demonstrate this. These works of God also reveal who Jesus is, in the flesh, for you and me.

The kingdom of God, Paul tells us, is not “eating and drinking” (Romans 14:17), nor is it “of this world,” as Jesus Himself says (John 18:36). Distresses, trouble, and tribulation will come, as will the storms and wind and water, yet He who has authority over these is also He who has authority over death itself, and who alone gives life, abundant life, eternal life.

“Truly, truly I say to you, he who hears My word and believes in Him who sent Me has everlasting life, and shall not come into judgment, but has passed from death into life. (John 5:24)

Prayer: Dearest Jesus, do not forsake us in our troubles, but deliver us from the evil one, that we remain steadfast in the true faith and not despair of our peace with You, who lived, died, and rose again for our salvation. Amen.

The one thing necessary

Freedom of  a ChristianOne thing, and only one thing, is necessary for Christian life, righteousness, and freedom. That one thing is the most holy Word of God, the gospel of Christ, as Christ says, John 11[:25], “I am the resurrection and the life; he who believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live”; and John 8[:36], “So if the Son makes you free, you will be free indeed”; and Matt. 4[:4], “Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceeds from the mouth of God.” Let us then consider it certain and firmly established that the soul can do without anything except the Word of God and that where the Word of God is missing there is no help at all for the soul. If it has the Word of God it is rich and lacks nothing since it is the Word of life, truth, light, peace, righteousness, salvation, joy, liberty, wisdom, power, grace, glory, and of every incalculable blessing.  On the other hand, there is no more terrible disaster with which the wrath of God can afflict men than a famine of the hearing of his Word, as he says in Amos [8:11]. Likewise there is no greater mercy than when he sends forth his Word, as we read in Psalm 107[:20]: “He sent forth his word, and healed them, and delivered them from destruction.” Nor was Christ sent into the world for any other ministry except that of the Word. Moreover, the entire spiritual estate—all the apostles, bishops, and priests—has been called and instituted only for the ministry of the Word. (LW 31, The Freedom of a Christian, 1520)

It is clear, then, that a Christian has all that he needs in faith and needs no works to justify him; and if he has no need of works, he has no need of the law; and if he has no need of the law, surely he is free from the law. It is true that “the law is not laid down for the just” [I Tim. 1:9]. This is that Christian liberty, our faith, which does not induce us to live in idleness or wickedness but makes the law and works unnecessary for any man’s righteousness and salvation. (LW 31, The Freedom of a Christian, 1520)

Free resources from Lutheran Press

What is Sola Scriptura?

Bible&CrucifixSola Scriptura is the Latin for “Scripture alone.”  Scripture alone means that the Bible, excluding the Apocrypha, is considered the “Only norm and rule for faith and life”[1].

Writing to St. Timothy, St. Paul the Apostle writes that the Holy Scriptures, “are able to make you wise for salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus.  All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, thoroughly equipped for every good work.” (2 Timothy 3:15-17).

Note that St. Paul references the purpose of the Holy Scriptures (the Old Testament, and then also, the New Testament writings) to be that of salvation.  Thus, does Jesus say to the people of His day, “You search the Scriptures, for in them you think you have eternal life; and these are they which testify of Me” (John 5:39).  Here, Jesus plainly says that the Scriptures (here, the Old Testament Scriptures, composed of the Law, the Writings (Psalms), and the Prophets bear witness to Him.

According to St. Luke, Jesus says to the two disciples on the road to Emmaus, “‘O foolish ones, and slow of heart to believe in all that the prophets have spoken!  Ought not the Christ to have suffered these things and to enter into His glory?’ And beginning at Moses and all the Prophets, He expounded to them in all the Scriptures the things concerning Himself” (Luke 24:25-27).  Here again, Jesus draws attention to the truth that the Old Testament writings are of Him.

Also in this same chapter of St. Luke, Jesus speaks in a similar way to his other disciples concerning His death and resurrection as recorded in the First Testament, “‘These are the words which I spoke to you while I was still with you, that all things must be fulfilled which were written in the Law of Moses and the Prophets and the Psalms concerning Me.’  And He opened their understanding, that they might comprehend the Scriptures. Then He said to them, ‘Thus it is written, and thus it was necessary for the Christ to suffer and to rise from the dead the third day, and that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in His name to all nations, beginning at Jerusalem’” (Luke 24:44-47).

Such references clearly show that the Old Testament testifies of Christ Jesus, by Jesus’ own admonition.  Jesus Himself bears witness to the centrality of the Christian faith—Himself, who “suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried” and “On the third day He rose again from the dead” (2nd Article of the Apostles’ Creed).

Throughout the Gospels, the Acts of the Apostles, and the Epistles of the New Testament, this truth is clearly shown, that the Old Testament testifies of Christ.  Thus, the New Testament, too, bears witness to Christ and clearly shows that the entire Bible is about Him and salvation.

St. Paul writes in Ephesians 2:20 of having been, “built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Jesus Christ Himself being the chief cornerstone.”  Here, Paul is writing to the “saints in Ephesus” (Ephesians 1:1), which included especially Gentiles.  The Gentile faith is no different from the faith of the Jews who also had believed in Christ, for the following words apply to both, “For by grace you have been saved through faith, and that not of yourselves; it is the gift of God, not of works, lest anyone should boast (Ephesians 2:8-9).

It is by God’s grace, apart from works, through faith, that anyone is saved.  This faith is founded on Christ Jesus, and is pure gift (see also Romans 5:1).  This, the Holy Scriptures teach.

The foundation of the apostles and prophets referenced above is nothing less than their preaching and teaching transmitted to us through their writings of both Old and New Testaments, with Christ at the center.

Add to, or subtract anything, from these writings, and the center is moved from Christ to something else.  Moving the center to something else leads to, and is “preaching another Gospel” (see Galatians 1:6-10) and carries with it the anathema of St. Paul, the Church, and Christ Himself (John 8:31-32; 14:21, 23-24.  This is why Sola Scriptura is necessary to retain and believe.

The writer to Proverbs writes that, “Every word of God is pure; He is a shield to those who put their trust in Him.  Do not add to His words, Lest He rebuke you, and you be found a liar” (30:5-6).

Adding to God’s Word does not lead to salvation, and only removes Christ from the centrality of the Christian faith.  Doing this is not according to God’s will and is not in accord with Christ and His Church, nor of Christian preaching.

Again, St. Paul writes, “We preach Christ crucified” (1 Corinthians 1:23).  Similarly, he repeats these words in his second letter to the Corinthians, “For we do not preach ourselves, but Christ Jesus the Lord, and ourselves your bondservants for Jesus’ sake” (2 Corinthians 4:5).

The Christian church keeps, retains, confesses, and rejoices in “Christ at the center,” in her preaching and in her teaching.  Adding to or subtracting from the Holy Scriptures, Christ’s church becomes something else, losing Christ its center.  What then follows is not the Gospel, but the Law and legalism, confession without Christian absolution, ritual without freedom, and the desire for salvation, but no certainty of God’s grace and favor.  Salvation then hangs on you and not alone on the risen Christ.  Such are the consequences of denying Sola Scriptura.

Generally speaking, Protestant churches retain Sola Scriptura, though not all faithfully adhere to it.  A growing phenomena today is that of referencing the Bible, but divorcing the reference from its context, and using the text to support one’s own position rather than deriving the meaning from the text itself.  We all are to be diligent here not to make the text say what we want it to say, but rather, “hearing” what the text actually does say and declaring the “amen,” regardless of like or dislike.

The problem here is that the Bible does say things “hard to understand” (2 Peter 3:16).  However, rather than trying to make the text make sense and placing ourselves over the Word as interpreters, we are to be servants of Scripture.  We are not lord over the text.  It is “Lord” over us.  The servant of the Lord does not seek to usurp God and His Word, but bears with it and seeks only to know Christ the Savior.  Keeping Sola Scriptura in tact and not adding to or subtracting from the text of Holy Scripture will ensure that Christ remains the center, as Christ remains the center of the Christian faith.[2]  Where Sola Scriptura is not held, there, other teachings will usurp Biblical doctrine, and another authority (or authorities) will insert his own teachings and doctrine as that to be believed.

This happens, for example, where reason is given higher authority than the Bible.  This occurs when human reason denies the Biblical text and “interprets” it in another way.  St. Peter, for example, writing about baptism, says, “There is also an antitype which now saves us — baptism (not the removal of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God), through the resurrection of Jesus Christ” (1 Peter 3:21, NKJ).  To deny that baptism can save or does save is to place human reason above the text of Holy Scripture.

According to Joel Peters, the author of Scripture Alone, “The Catholic holds that the immediate or direct rule of faith is the teaching of the Church; the Church in turn takes her teaching from divine Revelation—both the written Word, called sacred Scripture, and the oral of unwritten Word, known as ‘Tradition.’  The teaching authority or ‘Magisterium’ of the Catholic Church (headed by the Pope), although not itself a source of divine revelation, nevertheless has a God-given mission to interpret and teach both Scripture and Tradition.  Scripture and Tradition are the sources of Christian doctrine, the Christian’s remote or indirect rule of faith.”[3]

In summary, the rule of faith for protestants (generally, though variously defined, and sometimes along side of reason) is Holy (Sacred) Scripture, the Bible, Sola Scriptura.  For the Roman Catholic Church, the rule of faith is not Scripture alone, but Scripture and Tradition.  In practice, though, the latter cancels out the former.  As we shall see, Holy Scripture and the (oral?) Tradition of the Roman Catholic Church (or of the Orthodox Church) are not compatible as authorities, for the latter will assume authority over the latter.

The differing rules of faith between (historic)[4] Protestantism and Roman Catholicism are not at all complementary or compatible.[5]  They are at odds with each other.  Recognizing this distinction reveals much about the differences and practices between Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, not least of which is the centrality of the Christian faith—Jesus Christ, and the means of salvation—faith in Christ alone.


[1] Theodore G. Tappert, The Book of Concord : The Confessions of the Evangelical Lutheran Church (Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 2000, c1959).  Formula of Concord, Solid Declaration: “We pledge ourselves to the prophetic and apostolic writings of the Old and New Testaments as the pure and clear fountain of Israel, which is the only true norm according to which all teachers and teachings are to be judged and evaluated.” (The Summary Formulation (Basis, Rule, and Norm, Indicating How All Doctrines Should Be Judged in Conformity with the Word of God and Errors Are to Be Explained and Decided in a Christian Way).

 

[2] In a later section, I will address the clear disunity among protestant churches, and also the disunity within the Roman Catholic church.

[3] Joel Peters, Scripture Alone: 21 Reasons to Reject Sola Scriptura, (Rockford, IL: Tan Books and Publishers, Inc.), p1-2.

[4] By historic Protestantism, I mean the first protestants, Lutherans, who “protested” against the Catholics regarding certain freedoms at the Diet of Speyer (1529).

[5] And neither is any rule of faith including Scripture and human reason.

 

 

Christ is Risen!

ChristIsRisen.Matthew28.6

12 Now if Christ is proclaimed as raised from the dead, how can some of you say that there is no resurrection of the dead? 13 But if there is no resurrection of the dead, then not even Christ has been raised. 14 And if Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is in vain and your faith is in vain. 15 We are even found to be misrepresenting God, because we testified about God that he raised Christ, whom he did not raise if it is true that the dead are not raised. 16 For if the dead are not raised, not even Christ has been raised. 17 And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins. 18 Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished. 19 If in Christ we have hope2  in this life only, we are of all people most to be pitied.  20 But in fact Christ has been raised from the dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep. 21 For as by a man came death, by a man has come also the resurrection of the dead. 22 For as in Adam all die, so also in Christ shall all be made alive. (1 Corinthians 15:12-22)

In the Name of Jesus.  Amen.

We face a similar challenge to what St. Paul faced in the early church.  Note who Paul is writing to.  He’s not writing to nonbelievers, but to Christians, Christians in Corinth (1 Cor. 1:2), yet Christians who deny “that there is a resurrection of the dead” (1 Cor. 15:12).  In Paul’s day, as recorded in the text, there were those who denied that a resurrection of the dead existed.  This would also include the denial, and consequence, of Christ’s resurrection.

Today, there are those in Christendom who deny that Christ bodily rose from the dead.  These will indeed speak of a resurrection, but not a bodily, physical resurrection of our Lord.  As other parts of Holy Scripture are allegorized and considered “not real,” “mythical,” or merely “symbolical,” so it has come to be with the resurrection of Christ.

An examination of even one text, that of St. Luke, however, reveals a far different conclusion.  In Luke 24, Jesus appears to His disciples (after speaking with two disciples on the road to Emmaus (13-35).  In Luke’s account, Jesus says to His disciples, “See my hands and my feet, that I am He; touch and see, because a spirit does not have flesh and bone as you see me having” (39).  In addition, Jesus also eats fish in front of them (41-43).  By saying and doing these things, Jesus confirmed what the disciples saw (and had heard), that He was bodily alive, physically risen from the dead; not a ghost, not a phantasm, but truly and really the risen Lord and Christ in flesh and blood.

According to the text of Scripture, one cannot deny the bodily resurrection of our Lord.  To say that Jesus only has “risen in our hearts” or is alive somehow in a metaphysical or non-corporal way is really, to deny what the text says, and to reject the Christian faith, for as Paul states, “And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins. Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished” (1 Cor. 15:17-18).

To deny that there is a resurrection of the dead is to deny Christ’s resurrection from the dead.  And to deny Christ’s resurrection is deny the work of God for our salvation.  Faith in Christ would only be delusional and without any foundation whatsoever.  And if this were the case, we would still be lost in our sins, having no hope.  Christians would then be the most foolish of people, believing in something that didn’t happen as if it did.

Yet, as Paul, Peter, and the Evangelists reveal, Christ is risen (bodily) from the dead!  The tomb is empty, only because God the Father raised His Son from the grave (Acts 2:32).  This means that the message of our Lord is true!  Your faith in Christ is not in vain.  It is not useless, nor is it meaningless.  Nor do you remain in your sin.  Christ’s resurrection means that your sin no longer has any say over you (Romans 6:1-14; 8:32-34).  Christ’s resurrection also means that the resurrection of the dead is true.  This also means, your own to come.

Let others say what they will about the resurrection of our Lord, but we declare with Scripture, with the Apostles and Evangelists, and with the whole household of God, that God raised His Son from the dead.  Christ is risen.  He is risen indeed!  Hallelujah!

Prayer: Gracious Lord, grant us faith not to doubt, but to firmly believe in Your resurrection, which means also our own, from the dead.  Raise us to new life in You, that we deny ourselves, forsake our sin, and follow you.  Amen.

Readings for Easter Wednesday (C)

Jesus-OpenArms

Collect of the Day

Almighty God, by the glorious resurrection of Your Son, Jesus Christ, You destroyed death and brought life and immortality to light.  Grant that we who have been raised with Him may abide in His presence and rejoice in the hope of eternal glory; through the same Jesus Christ, our Lord, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen.

First Reading: Acts 3:13–15, 17–19

13“The God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, the God of our fathers, glorified his servant Jesus, whom you delivered over and denied in the presence of Pilate, when he had decided to release him. 14But you denied the Holy and Righteous One, and asked for a murderer to be granted to you, 15and you killed the Author of life, whom God raised from the dead. To this we are witnesses. . . .

      17“And now, brothers, I know that you acted in ignorance, as did also your rulers. 18But what God foretold by the mouth of all the prophets, that his Christ would suffer, he thus fulfilled. 19Repent therefore, and turn again, that your sins may be blotted out. . . .”

Epistle: Colossians 3:1–7

1If then you have been raised with Christ, seek the things that are above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God. 2Set your minds on things that are above, not on things that are on earth. 3For you have died, and your life is hidden with Christ in God. 4When Christ who is your life appears, then you also will appear with him in glory.

      5Put to death therefore what is earthly in you: sexual immorality, impurity, passion, evil desire, and covetousness, which is idolatry. 6On account of these the wrath of God is coming. 7In these you too once walked, when you were living in them.

Gospel: John 21:1–14

1After this Jesus revealed himself again to the disciples by the Sea of Tiberias, and he revealed himself in this way. 2Simon Peter, Thomas (called the Twin), Nathanael of Cana in Galilee, the sons of Zebedee, and two others of his disciples were together. 3Simon Peter said to them, “I am going fishing.” They said to him, “We will go with you.” They went out and got into the boat, but that night they caught nothing.

      4Just as day was breaking, Jesus stood on the shore; yet the disciples did not know that it was Jesus. 5Jesus said to them,  “Children, do you have any fish?” They answered him, “No.” 6He said to them,  “Cast the net on the right side of the boat, and you will find some.” So they cast it, and now they were not able to haul it in, because of the quantity of fish. 7That disciple whom Jesus loved therefore said to Peter, “It is the Lord!” When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he put on his outer garment, for he was stripped for work, and threw himself into the sea. 8The other disciples came in the boat, dragging the net full of fish, for they were not far from the land, but about a hundred yards off.

      9When they got out on land, they saw a charcoal fire in place, with fish laid out on it, and bread. 10Jesus said to them,  “Bring some of the fish that you have just caught.” 11So Simon Peter went aboard and hauled the net ashore, full of large fish, 153 of them. And although there were so many, the net was not torn. 12Jesus said to them,  “Come and have breakfast.” Now none of the disciples dared ask him, “Who are you?” They knew it was the Lord. 13Jesus came and took the bread and gave it to them, and so with the fish. 14This was now the third time that Jesus was revealed to the disciples after he was raised from the dead.

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